"Overcoming the obstacles of cancer actually helped me
prepare for my future. After treatment was over I was
able to see my life from a different perspective than most
people my age. I knew after my treatment was over that I
needed to start setting some goals for myself in order to
keep me focused and to move on from this disease. In
terms of everyday life, I've learned that a "bad hair day"
now is nothing compared to a "no hair day." Trying to
keep the ups and downs of life in perspective is not an
easy goal to achieve, but it is well worth the effort. I've
set the goal of maintaining friendships that helped me
through my ordeal, and investing time on the friendships I
know will last. I've also set the goal of looking at each
day as a new possibility for changing something I don't
like in my own life. At the same time, I've learned that
there is only so much a person can accomplish on any
given day, and it's all right to relax and watch life unfold.



The most important lesson I have learned from cancer is that nothing in life is certain. One
day everything could be going well and the next day, life can throw you a curveball. It's just
how you react to that curveball that can make all the difference."

Chrissie Fernandez
University of Flordia
at Gainesville
Christine Novotny
University of Michigan


"I strongly believe that I have been given a second
chance in life, and a second chance to pursue my
goals and "get it right." I have an amazing
opportunity to receive a superlative education from
the school of nursing at the University of Michigan.
With such an opportunity, I know that in the light of
any difficulties I will not back down in achieving my
fortified aspirations. My future should not and I can
guarantee will not be taken for granted. Many
wonderful peers that I have met who were not as
fortunate as I to have made it through, inspire me
each and every day to remember all that I have
learned from our battles. They help keep me
focused on achieving my dreams in life with the
obvious reality that they will never be able to fulfill
their own. This alone burns in my heart and in my
mind to not take my life for granted. Furthermore,
the absence of these special people reminds me that
I made it through and have something to offer, and
that in itself should not be carelessly overlooked."

Emma Pauly-Hubbard
Beloit College



"Environmentally irresponsible practices by
various people are suspected of having caused
my father's cancer. This is one of the reasons I
am interested in studying environmental science. I
want to know exactly how humans can negatively
impact the environment and each other by these
practices. The combination of my interest in
helping humans and species other than my own,
and my interest in gathering data straight from
nature influences what I want to major in college.

Cancer changed my life. Even were I to get a
chance to change going through that, I would
not. Having experienced that is so much a part of
me that I would not be Emma without it. I
suppose that in a way the saying that every cloud
having a silver lining is true, although if someone
had said that to me while I was recovering from
surgery or throwing up from the Chemo I would
have thrown a gauze pad at them."
Michelle Little
Ohio University
Richard Brewer
Bridgewater State College

"It was in the month of September, 2002 that I
realized how much of an effect cancer had had on
me. As my treatments were coming to an end and
my physical appearance was beginning to look a
little more like my old self, one of the friends I had
met during my many hospital stays, Henry, took a
turn for the worse. He had battled right along side of
me through the entire course of my treatment and at
the age of thirteen succumbed to Leukemia. During
all this time I guess I never thought that kids really
did die of cancer. This would be the first of many
friends who would lose their battle, each leaving an
indelible mark on my memory, sometimes funny and
sometimes sad, but every one changing me just a
little, reminding me of all that we had been through
and of all I still had to give and to share with others.

In April 2003, with the help of my family and friends, I established a fund through a fundraiser
we ran and named T.H.W.A.C.K. - Together Helping to win Against Cancer in Kids. We raised
$150,000 which was donated to the New England Medical Center's Children's Cancer Clinic in
memory of my good friend Henry.

It has been four years since my diagnosis. I have realized that there are certain things that cannot
be changed, that we need to take each day as it comes, worry about the things we can change
and deal with those things we can't. I know now that by staying focused and keeping a positive
attitude that you can through the toughest things in life. I often reflect back to the promise my
mom made to me that she wouldn't let cancer change my life. I guess some promises are just
made to be broken."

Mickey Ruggeri
University of Georgia

"Today I sit in the clinic waiting for a platelet transfusion while reflecting on my past and
thinking about my future. Cancer has taught me not only things about myself, but mostly
about little things in life. Every day I wake up, I tell myself it is another day I am alive. This
is one of the many new appreciations I have learned and will carry with me the rest of my
life. I know my battle with cancer will help me deal with new challenges I will face and for
this I would not change the fact that I am a cancer victim and survivor. Although it creates
so much pain and loss, I have found it to be rewarding. Through my journey with cancer I
learned about people, both close and strangers. Particularly my family because we
discovered how important it was to stick together and support one another. They were no
longer just my parents, siblings and immediate family; they were my caregivers and the
people I turned to. It made me realize that my parents, family and loved ones are not always
going to be around, and that our days should be valued. Most of all cancer has given me an
opportunity to realize what I want most out of life. I want happiness, love, health and a
career."



"There are so many things now that I want to do
and see now that I never thought of before. One
of these is spending time at Camp Sunshine, a
place for kids with cancer. I've shared my
experience with those who are going through
what I went through in hope that it helps them
feel a little bit better. I am also an Ambassador to
the Make A Wish Foundation, helping raise
money so that kids with cancer can have a
special dream come true, like I did. Before my
illness, I never would have thought of doing these
things and now I look forward to them.




Many times in the past my grandmother has said, "Everything happens for a reason." I never
took this saying very seriously or even really understood what it meant until now. The
struggles I have endured and the knowledge I have gained during the past year has made me a
better person. My values and purpose in life are now more clearly defined and appreciated."


2006-2007 Recipients



"Overcoming the obstacles of cancer actually helped me
prepare for my future. After treatment was over I was
able to see my life from a different perspective than most
people my age. I knew after my treatment was over that I
needed to start setting some goals for myself in order to
keep me focused and to move on from this disease. In
terms of everyday life, I've learned that a "bad hair day"
now is nothing compared to a "no hair day." Trying to
keep the ups and downs of life in perspective is not an
easy goal to achieve, but it is well worth the effort. I've
set the goal of maintaining friendships that helped me
through my ordeal, and investing time on the friendships I
know will last. I've also set the goal of looking at each
day as a new possibility for changing something I don't
like in my own life. At the same time, I've learned that
there is only so much a person can accomplish on any
given day, and it's all right to relax and watch life unfold.



The most important lesson I have learned from cancer is that nothing in life is certain. One
day everything could be going well and the next day, life can throw you a curveball. It's just
how you react to that curveball that can make all the difference."

Chrissie Fernandez
University of Flordia
at Gainesville
Christine Novotny
University of Michigan


"I strongly believe that I have been given a second
chance in life, and a second chance to pursue my
goals and "get it right." I have an amazing
opportunity to receive a superlative education from
the school of nursing at the University of Michigan.
With such an opportunity, I know that in the light of
any difficulties I will not back down in achieving my
fortified aspirations. My future should not and I can
guarantee will not be taken for granted. Many
wonderful peers that I have met who were not as
fortunate as I to have made it through, inspire me
each and every day to remember all that I have
learned from our battles. They help keep me
focused on achieving my dreams in life with the
obvious reality that they will never be able to fulfill
their own. This alone burns in my heart and in my
mind to not take my life for granted. Furthermore,
the absence of these special people reminds me that
I made it through and have something to offer, and
that in itself should not be carelessly overlooked."

Emma Pauly-Hubbard
Beloit College



"Environmentally irresponsible practices by
various people are suspected of having caused
my father's cancer. This is one of the reasons I
am interested in studying environmental science. I
want to know exactly how humans can negatively
impact the environment and each other by these
practices. The combination of my interest in
helping humans and species other than my own,
and my interest in gathering data straight from
nature influences what I want to major in college.

Cancer changed my life. Even were I to get a
chance to change going through that, I would
not. Having experienced that is so much a part of
me that I would not be Emma without it. I
suppose that in a way the saying that every cloud
having a silver lining is true, although if someone
had said that to me while I was recovering from
surgery or throwing up from the Chemo I would
have thrown a gauze pad at them."
Michelle Little
Ohio University
Richard Brewer
Bridgewater State College

"It was in the month of September, 2002 that I
realized how much of an effect cancer had had on
me. As my treatments were coming to an end and
my physical appearance was beginning to look a
little more like my old self, one of the friends I had
met during my many hospital stays, Henry, took a
turn for the worse. He had battled right along side of
me through the entire course of my treatment and at
the age of thirteen succumbed to Leukemia. During
all this time I guess I never thought that kids really
did die of cancer. This would be the first of many
friends who would lose their battle, each leaving an
indelible mark on my memory, sometimes funny and
sometimes sad, but every one changing me just a
little, reminding me of all that we had been through
and of all I still had to give and to share with others.

In April 2003, with the help of my family and friends, I established a fund through a fundraiser
we ran and named T.H.W.A.C.K. - Together Helping to win Against Cancer in Kids. We raised
$150,000 which was donated to the New England Medical Center's Children's Cancer Clinic in
memory of my good friend Henry.

It has been four years since my diagnosis. I have realized that there are certain things that cannot
be changed, that we need to take each day as it comes, worry about the things we can change
and deal with those things we can't. I know now that by staying focused and keeping a positive
attitude that you can through the toughest things in life. I often reflect back to the promise my
mom made to me that she wouldn't let cancer change my life. I guess some promises are just
made to be broken."

Mickey Ruggeri
University of Georgia

"Today I sit in the clinic waiting for a platelet transfusion while reflecting on my past and
thinking about my future. Cancer has taught me not only things about myself, but mostly
about little things in life. Every day I wake up, I tell myself it is another day I am alive. This
is one of the many new appreciations I have learned and will carry with me the rest of my
life. I know my battle with cancer will help me deal with new challenges I will face and for
this I would not change the fact that I am a cancer victim and survivor. Although it creates
so much pain and loss, I have found it to be rewarding. Through my journey with cancer I
learned about people, both close and strangers. Particularly my family because we
discovered how important it was to stick together and support one another. They were no
longer just my parents, siblings and immediate family; they were my caregivers and the
people I turned to. It made me realize that my parents, family and loved ones are not always
going to be around, and that our days should be valued. Most of all cancer has given me an
opportunity to realize what I want most out of life. I want happiness, love, health and a
career."



"There are so many things now that I want to do
and see now that I never thought of before. One
of these is spending time at Camp Sunshine, a
place for kids with cancer. I've shared my
experience with those who are going through
what I went through in hope that it helps them
feel a little bit better. I am also an Ambassador to
the Make A Wish Foundation, helping raise
money so that kids with cancer can have a
special dream come true, like I did. Before my
illness, I never would have thought of doing these
things and now I look forward to them.




Many times in the past my grandmother has said, "Everything happens for a reason." I never
took this saying very seriously or even really understood what it meant until now. The
struggles I have endured and the knowledge I have gained during the past year has made me a
better person. My values and purpose in life are now more clearly defined and appreciated."


The Kyle Lee Foundation, Inc.